‘The injured were lying there asking God to let them die’

*Of course, nobody cares, right? The zionists tell us that they aren’t human. We must all listen to our masters!! This situation is despicable. I have no words for this, I can only cry. It seems the powerful will always win.*

Being a health worker, I had to check the needs of Shifa hospital and the other hospitals in Gaza. The situation in Shifa is really bad. There were corpses in corridors covered with blankets. The mortuary couldn’t cope with the number of bodies. Two bodies were left on stretchers, one wrapped in a blanket. They leave them until families can recognise them.

There were mothers, fathers looking for children, looking for relatives. Everyone was confused and seeking support. Mothers were crying, people were asking about relatives, the medical team was confused.

Some people were just lying there, some were screaming, some were very, very angry. There were a lot of injured arriving, ambulances coming in and out. The injured were coming by private cars and they were being left wherever. You could see blood here and there.

There is talk [the Israeli air strikes] were targeting the police and security forces but in Shifa hospital, I saw many, many civilians, some dead, some injured, some were children, some were women, some were elderly people.

There are people without their legs in very severe pain. The doctors and nurses were trying to give them painkillers and to keep them alive. Patients are lying there knowing they’ve lost their legs. Some were asking God if they could die. They were in a terrible psychological state.

The doctors and nurses were trying to do their best. They discharged all the patients from the chronic diseases ward and from the oncology ward to make way for the injured. They were using whatever they could.

There’s no gauze so they are using cotton, which sticks to the wounds. They can’t sterilise clothes for the operating theatre. They’re using wrong sized syringes. They’re working 24 hours. They’re referring cases from one hospital to the next. One hospital was running out of anaesthesia. They’re also drawing blood and there’s no alcohol. This is a disaster.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/dec/29/israel-gaza-attack-shifa-hospital

Anger, sadness over fabricated Holocaust story

*This is starting to become common.*

NEW YORK – It’s the latest story that touched, and betrayed, the world.

“Herman Rosenblat and his wife are the most gentle, loving, beautiful people,” literary agent Andrea Hurst said Sunday, anguishing over why she, and so many others, were taken by Rosenblat’s story of love born on opposite sides of a barbed-wire fence at a concentration camp.

“I question why I never questioned it. I believed it; it was an incredible, hope-filled story.”

On Saturday, Berkley Books canceled Rosenblat’s memoir, “Angel at the Fence.” Rosenblat acknowledged that he and his wife did not meet, as they had said for years, at a sub-camp of Buchenwald, where she allegedly sneaked him apples and bread. The book was supposed to come out in February.

Rosenblat, 79, has been married to the former Roma Radzicky for 50 years, since meeting her on a blind date in New York. In a statement issued Saturday through his agent, he described himself as an advocate of love and tolerance who falsified his past to better spread his message.

“I wanted to bring happiness to people,” said Rosenblat, who now lives in the Miami area. “I brought hope to a lot of people. My motivation was to make good in this world.”

Rosenblat’s believers included not only his agent and his publisher, but Oprah Winfrey, film producers, journalists, family members and strangers who ignored, or didn’t know about, the warnings from scholars that his story didn’t make sense.

Other Holocaust memoirists have devised greater fantasies. Misha Defonseca, author of “Misha: A Memoire of the Holocaust Years,” pretended she was a Jewish girl who lived with wolves during the war, when she was actually a non-Jew who lived, without wolves, in Belgium.

Historical records prove Rosenblat was indeed at Buchenwald and other camps.

“How sad that he felt he had to embellish a life of surviving the Holocaust and of being married for half a century,” said Holocaust scholar Michael Berenbaum.

The damage is broad. Publishing, the most trusting of industries, has again been burned by a memoir that fact-checking might have prevented. Berkley is an imprint of Penguin Group (USA), which in March pulled Margaret B. Jones’ “Love and Consequences” after the author acknowledged she had invented her story of gang life in Los Angeles. Winfrey fell, as she did with James Frey, for a narrative of suffering and redemption better suited for television than for history.

The damage is deep. Scholars and other skeptics as well as fellow survivors fear that Rosenblat’s fabrications will only encourage doubts about the Holocaust.

“I am very worried because many of us speak to thousands of student each year,” says Sidney Finkel, a longtime friend of Rosenblat’s and a fellow survivor. “We go before audiences. We tell them a story and now some people will question what I experienced.”

“This was not Holocaust education but miseducation,” Ken Waltzer, director of Jewish Studies at Michigan State University, said in a statement.

“Holocaust experience is not heartwarming, it is heart rending. All this shows something about the broad unwillingness in our culture to confront the difficult knowledge of the Holocaust,” Waltzer said. “All the more important then to have real memoirs that tell of real experience in the camps.”

Among the fooled, at least the partially fooled, was Berenbaum, former director of the United States Holocaust Research Institute at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. Berenbaum had been asked to read the manuscript by film producer Harris Salomon, who still plans an adaptation of the book.

Berenbaum’s tentative support — “Crazier things have happened,” he told The Associated Press last fall — was cited by the publisher as it initially defended the book. Berenbaum now says he saw factual errors, including Rosenblat’s description of Theresienstadt, the camp from which he was eventually liberated, but didn’t think of challenging the love story.

“There’s a limit to what I can verify, because I was not there,” he says. “I can verify the general historical narrative, but in my research I rely upon the survivors to present the specifics of their existence with integrity. When they don’t, they destroy so much and they ruin so much, and that’s terrible.”

“I was burned,” he added. “And I have to read books more skeptically because I was burned.”

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081228/ap_on_en_ot/books_holocaust_memoir

Author of Holocaust book admits it is not true

*No comment.*

Almost nothing Misha Defonseca wrote about herself or her horrific childhood during the Holocaust was true.

She didn’t live with a pack of wolves to escape the Nazis. She didn’t trek 1,900 miles across Europe in search of her deported parents, nor kill a German soldier in self-defense. She’s not even Jewish.

Defonseca, a Belgian writer now living in Massachusetts, admitted through her lawyers this week that her best-selling book, “Misha: A Memoire of the Holocaust Years,” was an elaborate fantasy she kept repeating, even as the book was translated into 18 languages and made into a feature film in France.

“This story is mine. It is not actually reality, but my reality, my way of surviving,” Defonseca said in a statement given by her lawyers to The Associated Press.

“I ask forgiveness to all who felt betrayed. I beg you to put yourself in my place, of a 4-year-old girl who was very lost,” the statement said.

Defonseca, 71, has an unlisted number in Dudley, about 50 miles southwest of Boston. Her husband, Maurice, told The Boston Globe on Thursday that she would not comment.

Defonseca wrote in her book that Nazis seized her parents when she was a child, forcing her to wander the forests and villages of Europe alone for four years. She claimed she found herself trapped in the Warsaw ghetto and was adopted by a pack of wolves that protected her.

Her two Brussels-based lawyers said the author acknowledged her story was not autobiographical. In the statement, Defonseca said she never fled her home in Brussels during the war to find her parents.

Defonseca says her real name is Monique De Wael and that her parents were arrested and killed by Nazis as Belgian resistance fighters.

The statement said her parents were arrested when she was 4 and she was taken care of by her grandfather and uncle. She said she was poorly treated by her adopted family, called a “daughter of a traitor” because of her parents’ role in the resistance, which she said led her to “feel Jewish.”

She said there were moments when she “found it difficult to differentiate between what was real and what was part of my imagination.”

Pressure on the author to defend the accuracy of her book had grown in recent weeks, after the release of evidence found by Sharon Sergeant, a genealogical researcher in Waltham. Sergeant said she found clues in the unpublished U.S. version of the book, including Defonseca’s maiden name “De Wael” – which was changed in the French version – and photos.

After a few months of research, she found Defonseca’s Belgium baptismal certificate and school record, as well as information that showed her parents were members of the Belgian resistance.

“Each piece was plausible, but the difficulty was when you put it all together,” Sergeant said.

Others also had doubts.

“I’m not an expert on relations between humans and wolves, but I am a specialist of the persecution of Jews, and they (Defonseca’s family) can’t be found in the archives,” Belgian historian Maxime Steinberg told RTL television. “The De Wael family is not Jewish nor were they registered as Jewish.”

Multimillion dollar legal battle

Defonseca’s attorneys, siblings Nathalie and Marc Uyttendaele, contacted the author last weekend to show her evidence published in the Belgian daily Le Soir, which also questioned her story.

“We gave her this information and it was very difficult. She was confronted with a reality that is different from what she has been living for 70 years,” Nathalie Uyttendaele said.

Defonseca’s admission is just the latest controversy surrounding her 1997 book, which also spawned a multimillion dollar legal battle between the woman, her co-author and the book’s US publisher.

Defonseca had been asked to write the book by publisher Jane Daniel in the 1990s, after Daniel heard the writer tell the story in a Massachusetts synagogue.

Daniel and Defonseca fell out over profits received from the best-selling book, which led to a lawsuit. In 2005, a Boston court ordered Daniel to pay Defonseca and her ghost writer Vera Lee $22.5 million. Defonseca’s lawyers said Daniel has not yet paid the court-ordered sum.

Daniel said Friday she felt vindicated by Defonseca’s admission and would try to get the judgment overturned. She said she could not fully research Defonseca’s story before it was published because the woman claimed she did not know her parents’ names, her birthday or where she was born.

“There was nothing to go on to research,” she said.

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Lee, of Newton, muttered “Oh my God” when told Defonseca made up her childhood and was not Jewish. She said she always believed the stories the woman told her as they prepared to write the book, and no research she did gave her a reason not to.

“She always maintained that this was truth as she recalled it, and I trusted that that was the case,” Lee said. “I was just totally bowled over by the news.”

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3513122,00.html

10 things that won’t survive the recession

1. Free tech support

The practice still employed by some companies of paying humans to answer phones and solve consumers’ problems with hardware or software will become a thing of the past. PCs, laptops and hardware peripherals, as well as application software will be purchased like airline tickets, with price becoming the sole criteria for many buyers. In order to compete on price, companies that now offer real tech support will replace it with message boards (users helping users), wikis, wizards, software-based troubleshooting tools and other unsatisfying alternatives.
2. Wi-Fi you have to pay for

Everyone is going to share the cost of public Wi-Fi because the penny-pinching public will gravitate to places that offer “free” Wi-Fi. Companies that charge extra for Wi-Fi will see their iPhone, BlackBerry and netbook-toting customers — i.e., everybody — taking their business elsewhere. The only place you’ll pay for Wi-Fi will be on an airplane.
3. Landline phones

Digital phone bundles for homes (where TV service, Internet connections and landline phone service are offered in a total package) will keep the landline idea alive for a while, but as millions of households drop their cable TV service and as consumers look to cut all needless costs, the trend toward dropping landline service in favor of cell phone service only will accelerate until it’s totally mainstream, and only grandma still has a landline phone.
4. Movie rental stores

The idea of retail operations where you drive to a store, pick a movie, stand in line and then drive home with the movie will become a quaint relic of the new fin de siècle (look it up!). The new old way to get movies will be discs by mail, and the new, new way will be downloading.
5. Web 2.0 companies without a business plan

The era when Web-based companies could emerge and grow on venture capital, collecting eyeballs and members at a rapid clip and deferring the business plan until later are dead and gone. Yeah, I’m talking to you, Twitter. Sand Hill Road-style venture capital is shrinking toward nothing, and investors in general will be hard to come by. Those few remaining investors will want to see real, solid business plans before the first dollar is wired to any start-up’s bank.
6. Most companies in Silicon Valley

Tech company failures and mergers will leave the industry with a low two-digit percentage (maybe 25%) of the total number of companies now in existence. Like the automobile industry, which had more than 200 car makers in the 1920s and emerged from the Depression with just a few, Silicon Valley is in for some serious contraction. The difference is that the auto industry ended up with the Big Three, whereas the number of tech companies will grow dramatically again during the next boom.
7. Palm Inc.

Elevation Partners, which has among its principals U2′s Bono, pumped a whopping $100 million into the failing Palm Inc. this week.

The idea is to give the company time to release its forthcoming Nova operating system, which will take the cell-phone world by storm and give Apple a run for its money. It would have been far more efficient, however, to just flush that money down the toilet. With the iPhone setting the handset interface agenda, BlackBerry-maker RIM kicking butt in the businesses market, and Google stirring up trouble with its Android platform, this is no time for a clueless company like Palm to be introducing a new operating system. By this time next year, Palm will be gone. And so might Elevation Partners.
8. Yahoo

Yahoo Inc. is another company that can’t seem to do anything right. Or, at least, can’t compete with Google. Yahoo will be acquired by someone, and its brand will become an empty shell — used for some inane set of services but appreciated only by armchair historians (joining the ranks of Netscape, Napster and Commodore).
9. Half of all retail stores

Many retail stores are obsolete and will be replaced by online competitors. Entire malls will become ghost towns. By this time next year, most video game stores, book stores and toy stores — as well as brick-and-mortar shops in many other categories — will simply vanish. Amazon.com will grow and grow.
10. Satellite Radio
I’m sorry, Howard Stern. It’s over. The newly merged Sirius XM Radio simply cannot sustain its losses. The company is already deeply in debt and would need to dramatically increase subscribers over the next six months in order to meet its debt obligations. Unfortunately, new car sales, which account for a huge percentage of satellite radio sales, are in the gutter and stand-alone subscriptions are way down.

Change is hard. But efficiency is good. While boom years gives us radical innovation and improve consumer choice, recessions help us focus on what’s really important and accelerate the demise of technologies and companies that are already obsolete.

So say good-bye to these 10 things, and say hello (eventually) to a new economy, a new boom and a new way of doing things.

http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&taxonomyName=Mobile+and+Wireless&articleId=9124260&taxonomyId=15&pageNumber=2

Health services releases Norovirus warning

EDMONTON – Recent outbreaks of Norovirus could make the holidays a lot less merry for Edmonton families.

Alberta Health Services released an advisory this week in Edmonton, said the holiday combination of food and family could be a potent mix for more outbreaks.

“It’s a time when people get together in groups and they serve food. Both are places where Norovirus can be transmitted.”

The highly contagious virus spreads through direct human contact and can be transmitted by surfaces and food preparation. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, fever and aches, and typically last 24 to 48 hours.

Transmission of Norovirus can be slowed by frequent hand washing, particularly before eating or after using the bathroom. Talbot said anyone feeling ill should stay away from food preparation, despite the holiday temptation to pitch in.

“The last thing you want to do is be responsible for your friends and family falling ill,” he said.

For families that experience an outbreak, medical attention is rarely necessary and should be sought only if symptoms persist for more than 72 hours or are particularly severe.

Loss of fluids can be dangerous for the young or the elderly.

“If you’re dealing with a young child or someone who is older and you think they’re starting to get in trouble, it’s a good idea to seek medical care more quickly,” he said.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Health+services+releases+Norovirus+warning/1113265/story.html

India alerts air force along Line of Control Transports heavy guns, ammunition

Islamabad—As India continued transporting heavy guns and war machines to strategic areas along Line of Control Indian Army Chief General Deepak Kapoor Thursday rushed to Siachen Glacier and forward areas of occupied Jammu and Kashmir “to check the operational preparedness of the troops.”

Intelligence reports confirmed Thursday extra-ordinary moves at India’s Western Air Command with headquarters in Delhi which is responsible for air operations from occupied Kashmir to Rajasthan including Punjab. Thursday a movement of Indian Air Force Operations Group dedicated for occupied Jammu & Kashmir including Ladakh was also detected by the defence observers in the region.

According to Indian media reports that Gen Kapoor left for Siachen Glacier “on Thursday and will interact with the unit commanders and senior officers, before returning to the Capital after taking stock of the situation.”

The report added that India too had deployed Quick Reaction Air Force and Army teams at Western border.

The media reports confirmed that India has deployed Quick Reaction Air Force and Army teams on the western border. “Air force units have also been deployed at Jaisalmer, Barmer and Bhuj”.

There are five operational air commands in India controlling 45 fixed-wing squadrons and 20 helicopter units.

India’s Mi 26 heavy lift helicopter fleet was also seen active Thursday transporting heavy gins and ammunition along the borders with Pakistan while Mi 17s and Mi 8s, were also seen moving along the LoC.

http://pakobserver.net/200812/26/news/topstories03.asp

Lovely…Nintendo to Release Holocaust Video Game

Think a Nintendo game is a good way to teach kids about the Holocaust? A 21-year-old British video game developer does, and the company producing his latest creation hopes to have it ready for distribution in Europe by the end of the year. Luc Bernard’s game, Imagination Is the Only Escape, is based on the ways that the Nazis tortured children, and won’t be distributed in the US.

Reactions have been as condemnatory as you’d expect. However, Bernard maintains that he’s not trying to make light of the suffering of children. He promises that there won’t be any on-screen violence, and though Alten8–the company producing the game–originally asked him to remove all swastikas from the game, it subsequently backed off. Bernard says he’s trying to make a game that will be educational and appropriate for young children, and points out that his mother is Jewish and members of his family took care of Jewish orphans after World War II.

So far, the most interesting response has come from the Anti-Defamation League. Instead of lashing out against Bernard and Alten8, Myrna Shinbaum, a spokeswoman for the ADL, is quoted as saying, “We certainly believe that we have to find new ways of teaching lessons of the Holocaust as new technologies are being developed.”

http://www.jewcy.com/post/holocaust_game#